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Sámi Film Festival

Stills from The Last Walk. A Sami woman looking into the distance, and a mountain or hill.
Oct 26
Film
Sámi Film Festival
Oct 26, 2019
10:00am - 5:00pm
Event date

Our second Sámi Film Festival explores Sámi values, visions, and stories. The day of shorts and documentaries from Finnish, Norwegian, and Swedish Sámi includes panel discussions, filmmaker visits, and a happy hour. In partnership with Pacific Sámi Searvi. Part of the proceeds will benefit the Pacific Sámi Searvi. 


Festival Schedule

10am—Guided Tour (included for festival pass holders)
Join members of the Pacific Sámi Searvi to view and discuss the Sámi components of the permanent exhibits of the National Nordic Museum.

11am—Screenings

Riddu Riđđu (a multi-ethnic exploration of identity)
Short/Documentary | Sápmi/Sweden | 2019 | 10 minutes | Sinchi Foundation 
Riddu Riđđu is an annual indigenous festival in the Norwegian part of the Sámi territory. Riddu Riđđu (literally, “little storm by the coast”) was first held in 1991 by Sámi youth with the objective of reclaiming their identity after 150 years of assimilation politics. Nowadays, it's grown into a meeting place for indigenous cultures from all over the world to celebrate cultural expressions. Sinchi Foundation was pleased to join Riddu Riđđu in July 2019 to experience the Sámi way of life first-hand and made a full photo and video documentation of the program, including an interview with 28-year-old festival director Sandra Márjá West. What we found there was a genuine celebration of humanity and a cross-border place where all people can find something they enjoy amidst an enchanting natural environment.

The Last Walk 
Shorts | Sápmi/Finland/Canada/Greenland/Alaska | 2017 | 45 minutes | Jerri Thrasher/ Mikisoq H. Lynge & Pipaluk K. Jørgensen/Anna Hoover
Produced by the Arctic Film Circle, a network of Circumpolar Indigenous Filmmakers, “The Last Walk” is a collection of three works of short fiction stitched together to tell stories that highlight the common experiences indigenous people have undertaken in each filmmaker's specific home region. The films weave together traditional and contemporary storytelling techniques and ultimately present a new wave of indigenous film in the Arctic — one that pays homage to our history as well as empowering a generation of modern storytellers. Director Anna Hoover will be attending; a Q&A session will follow the screening.

12:30pm—Lunch

2pm—Screening

Gallók
Documentary | Sápmi/Sweden | 2018 | 84 minutes (?) | Truls Andersen
A troubled nature photographer, Tor Tuorda, risks everything in his fight against a new mine in the Nordic wilderness. He faces strong political and economic forces, local rivals and a Sámi collective that hesitates to accept him as one of their own. Photographer Tor Tuorda and his daughter Astrid Tuorda will be attending; a Q&A session will follow the screening.

4pm—Happy Hour

5pm—Screenings

Eatnanvuloš lottit - Maan sisalla linnut Birds of the Earth
Shorts | Finland | 2018 | 11 minutes | Marja Helander
Two Sámi ballet dancers perform the contradiction between nature and a modern lifestyle. Marja Helander is a Sámi artist from Finland. Helander’s films include "Birds of the Earth" (2018), which received the Risto Jarva Award at Tampere Film Festival, and "Dolastallat" (2016), which won the Kent Monkman award at ImagineNATIVE Film Festival. 

Brennende minner / Burning Memories 
Documentary | Norway | 2018 | 58 minutes | Ellen-Astri Lundby
Burning Memories tells the story of being a war child, both in the past and the present. We meet six elderly witnesses who became refugees in their own country in 1944 and join them for emotional encounters with refugee children living in the far north of Norway today. The film examines the greatest trauma 75,000 Norwegian civilians endured during World War II: being chased from their homes and returning to nothing but scorched earth when the war ended. Ellen-Astri Lundby has been working as an independent filmmaker since 1989. She has produced and directed several short films, both fiction and personal documentaries. Two of her previous films, Suddenly Sámi and Yoik Fever, were featured in Seattle at the Nordic lights Film Festival and the National Nordic Museum. Watch the trailer here.


Festival passes are now on sale! Tickets for individual shows will be available mid-October. 

Cost: Members: $25 all-day pass; $10 individual tickets.
General admission: $30 all-day pass; $13 individual tickets. 

We are happy to extend our membership price to our friends at the Pacific Sáami Searvi. Please contact Stina Cowan at [email protected] with issues or questions. 

Sámi Film Festival

Our second Sámi Film Festival explores Sámi values, visions, and stories. The day of shorts and documentaries from Finnish, Norwegian, and Swedish Sámi includes panel discussions, filmmaker visits, and a happy hour. In partnership with Pacific Sámi Searvi. Part of the proceeds will benefit the Pacific Sámi Searvi. 


Festival Schedule

10am—Guided Tour (included for festival pass holders)
Join members of the Pacific Sámi Searvi to view and discuss the Sámi components of the permanent exhibits of the National Nordic Museum.

11am—Screenings

Riddu Riđđu (a multi-ethnic exploration of identity)
Short/Documentary | Sápmi/Sweden | 2019 | 10 minutes | Sinchi Foundation 
Riddu Riđđu is an annual indigenous festival in the Norwegian part of the Sámi territory. Riddu Riđđu (literally, “little storm by the coast”) was first held in 1991 by Sámi youth with the objective of reclaiming their identity after 150 years of assimilation politics. Nowadays, it's grown into a meeting place for indigenous cultures from all over the world to celebrate cultural expressions. Sinchi Foundation was pleased to join Riddu Riđđu in July 2019 to experience the Sámi way of life first-hand and made a full photo and video documentation of the program, including an interview with 28-year-old festival director Sandra Márjá West. What we found there was a genuine celebration of humanity and a cross-border place where all people can find something they enjoy amidst an enchanting natural environment.

The Last Walk 
Shorts | Sápmi/Finland/Canada/Greenland/Alaska | 2017 | 45 minutes | Jerri Thrasher/ Mikisoq H. Lynge & Pipaluk K. Jørgensen/Anna Hoover
Produced by the Arctic Film Circle, a network of Circumpolar Indigenous Filmmakers, “The Last Walk” is a collection of three works of short fiction stitched together to tell stories that highlight the common experiences indigenous people have undertaken in each filmmaker's specific home region. The films weave together traditional and contemporary storytelling techniques and ultimately present a new wave of indigenous film in the Arctic — one that pays homage to our history as well as empowering a generation of modern storytellers. Director Anna Hoover will be attending; a Q&A session will follow the screening.

12:30pm—Lunch

2pm—Screening

Gallók
Documentary | Sápmi/Sweden | 2018 | 84 minutes (?) | Truls Andersen
A troubled nature photographer, Tor Tuorda, risks everything in his fight against a new mine in the Nordic wilderness. He faces strong political and economic forces, local rivals and a Sámi collective that hesitates to accept him as one of their own. Photographer Tor Tuorda and his daughter Astrid Tuorda will be attending; a Q&A session will follow the screening.

4pm—Happy Hour

5pm—Screenings

Eatnanvuloš lottit - Maan sisalla linnut Birds of the Earth
Shorts | Finland | 2018 | 11 minutes | Marja Helander
Two Sámi ballet dancers perform the contradiction between nature and a modern lifestyle. Marja Helander is a Sámi artist from Finland. Helander’s films include "Birds of the Earth" (2018), which received the Risto Jarva Award at Tampere Film Festival, and "Dolastallat" (2016), which won the Kent Monkman award at ImagineNATIVE Film Festival. 

Brennende minner / Burning Memories 
Documentary | Norway | 2018 | 58 minutes | Ellen-Astri Lundby
Burning Memories tells the story of being a war child, both in the past and the present. We meet six elderly witnesses who became refugees in their own country in 1944 and join them for emotional encounters with refugee children living in the far north of Norway today. The film examines the greatest trauma 75,000 Norwegian civilians endured during World War II: being chased from their homes and returning to nothing but scorched earth when the war ended. Ellen-Astri Lundby has been working as an independent filmmaker since 1989. She has produced and directed several short films, both fiction and personal documentaries. Two of her previous films, Suddenly Sámi and Yoik Fever, were featured in Seattle at the Nordic lights Film Festival and the National Nordic Museum. Watch the trailer here.


Festival passes are now on sale! Tickets for individual shows will be available mid-October. 

Cost: Members: $25 all-day pass; $10 individual tickets.
General admission: $30 all-day pass; $13 individual tickets. 

We are happy to extend our membership price to our friends at the Pacific Sáami Searvi. Please contact Stina Cowan at [email protected] with issues or questions. 

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